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Upgrading Porsche 997 Turbo suspension with RSS Tarmac Series

Killer-M | On 09, Aug 2014

Upgrading Porsche 997 Turbo suspension with RSS Tarmac Series

It’s been a few months now that a strange creek has developed from the front of the car, and progressively becoming worse (after spirited driving or any prolonged drive on a hot day). Going consensus is that it is the front Control Arm. I figured, if I’m replacing that, I might as well replace some other suspension parts.

It’s been a few months now that a strange creek has developed from the front of the car, and progressively becoming worse (after spirited driving or any prolonged drive on a hot day). Going consensus is that it is the front Control Arm.

I figured, if I’m replacing that, I might as well replace some other suspension parts.

Currently my suspension setup:
1) RSS Sway bars (front and rear)
2) RSS Rear drop links
3) RSS Solid engine mounts (best bang for the buck upgrade money can buy IMO)
Bilstein B16 Damptronic (had serious problems with these and wouldn’t go this route again – but that’s another story).

Just those little changes (above) have dramatically increased driver feedback and dynamics over stock.

As for new components used to upgrade the Porsche 997 Turbo suspension…

1) GiroDisk rotors (mine are pretty much toast, so thought I might just do them at the same time – and they are lighter than OEM, and have received substantially better reviews over OEM) [GIR-734]
2) RSS Lower Control Arms (Front and Rear) [RSS-357, RSS-361]
3) RSS Adjustable Rear link kit (Dog Bones) [RSS-307]
4) RSS Rear Adjustable Toe Steer Kit [RSS-312]
5) Rear toe locking plates [RSS-333]
6) RSS Front Adjustable sway bar droplinks (to get rid of those laughable bilstein B16 toothpicks :p ) [RSS-315] (these will not fit the Bilstein B16 shocks. Turns out I’ll be shipping them back and sourcing the longer Tarett Front Drop Links)
7) RSS Dustboots, not included in pic, but great little add on to preserve the life of the joints for a daily driver. [RSS-30178]
8) Tarett front and rear camber plates. (Note that my rear plates didn’t fit the Bilstein B16 Shocks. Front’s fit fine. The reason is I had two failures with the front shocks and both of them were replaced under Bilstein’s lifetime warranty. The rears were never replaced and it appears that the older production line shocks used a higher lip. The shocks fit fine on OEM mounts but not the Tarett plates).
9) Numeric Racing Performance shifter
10) Numeric Racing cup cables
11) Numeric Racing solid transmission mounts (road)
And…
12) Front windscreen – Not included in pic, but the thing took a rock big chip a few months ago.

If you haven’t read my previous post on upgrading your Porsche 997 suspension check it our here.

 

porsche-997-turbo-RSS-GiroDisc-suspension-costs

I’d like to thank a few guys that helped me with the order:
-Dan at Numeric Racing, thanks for details on transmission mounts, setup, and other info.
-Mike at RSS, who was incredibly helpful in helping me understand exactly what components are absolutely a must, and the perfect performance handling setup.

…and Finally Ilker at SportsCarBoutique (RSS, GiroDisc) who sourced 90% of the components and shipped them to me. It took a while to get everything in, however the service and prices just couldn’t be beat anywhere else (I’m in Canada).

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As for alignment. We went back and forth to try to identify the best street/track compremise. Tire ware was very important but so was the turn in and understeer that we were looking to kill. Specifically coming out of a corner on hard throttle and with a switchback, the 997 Turbo has a reputation for understeering – the all wheel drive doesn’t help either.

Another big consideration was bumpsteer and how the front suspension behaves under breaking. All these concerns taken, we decided to increase the front and rear camber to -2.5 and -2 respectfully, from -2 and -1.5. Some other adjustments were made to ensure just the setup we were looking for. With the above components in play, a more aggressive alignment that behaves proper well was easily achievable. With out these RSS suspension upgrades you would have to rely on some trics like turning the camber plates around, etc. Personally I wouldn’t recommend that. If you’re spending the time getting the Porsche 997 Turbo to behave right, do it right the first time.

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Porsche 997 Short Shifter

Let me start by saying this: If you enjoy rowing through gears, you have to – and I do mean, have to seriously look at this mod!

Numeric Racing make easily one of the most beautiful pieces of mechanical machinery when it comes to after-market suppliers. I personally was seriously considering leaving the centre console off to expose the shift kit, and in the future I actually might do that.  As to the driving dynamics, and feel – it trumps what you would feel in a GT2 and GT3. I’m not exaggerating when I say that it overshadows GT/ OEM feel.

In comparison, with my previous Porsche I installed a B&M short shift kit, and again I would say that this kit is light years apart. The shifts do not require much more pressure to engage, they are incredibly precise with a proper notchy feel, something you would expect from the GT cars, but back to back they feel mushy. The other components added were cup race cables, also made by Numeric racing and the street solid transmission mounts.

I should also mention that the shifter now sits a little higher, maybe half an inch higher than the stock OEM position, which in my opinion is more comfortable and that much easier to reach when you hand comes off the wheel. This is a mod I would highly recommend!

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